Why I'm transitioning away from Veganism

After 6 years of eating a vegan diet, I finally added some fish, eggs and goat whey protein to my diet. My approach to diet and lifestyle has always been one of awareness and common sense, with the goal of creating optimal health and vitality. I have a family history of weak bones, and was starting to notice that I may have signs of that. After consulting with some holistic experts in the field, I (reluctantly I must add!) started to make changes. It was a journey, but after a month, I now am feeling the benefits. My hair is thicker, nails are stronger, skin is clearer, I feel calmer and stronger. It has benefited my playing too! I love and respect the vegan diet and lifestyle, and originally transitioned to it because fish, chicken, eggs and dairy no longer sat well with me. But as I said, my approach to diet and lifestyle has always been one of awareness and common sense. And I'd like to be healthy and strong for many years to come!! And so the journey continues…

5 comments

  • Bryan Caldwell

    Bryan Caldwell CA

    Many people are just not suited to a 100% vegan diet. It's how you feel that's important - not the label you put on it.

    Many people are just not suited to a 100% vegan diet. It's how you feel that's important - not the label you put on it.

  • Raymond

    Raymond Salinas, CA

    I read recently that eggs have B12 and might be a good supplement for an otherwise vegan diet. There's a good couple of quotes from nutritionists on the http://metro.co.uk/2016/01/20/so-veggan-is-a-thing-a-vegan-who-eats-eggs-but-whats-the-point-5634794/ page under the "What do nutritionists say?" section. I may not be a perfect vegan, but I'm feeling way healthier than I did as an American omnivore. The "veggan" search results I saw seem to indicate that it's still pretty early for a consensus on if this is a fad or a real thing. I hope the information helps.

    I read recently that eggs have B12 and might be a good supplement for an otherwise vegan diet. There's a good couple of quotes from nutritionists on the http://metro.co.uk/2016/01/20/so-veggan-is-a-thing-a-vegan-who-eats-eggs-but-whats-the-point-5634794/ page under the "What do nutritionists say?" section. I may not be a perfect vegan, but I'm feeling way healthier than I did as an American omnivore. The "veggan" search results I saw seem to indicate that it's still pretty early for a consensus on if this is a fad or a real thing. I hope the information helps.

  • Tony Franklin

    Tony Franklin Right here

    Thanks guys. I actually waited for a month or so before I posted about transitioning from a vegan diet. I've always been health conscious, and much of that starts with our food choices. I always said, even as a vegan, that if I felt the need for meat or animal protein in my diet, I would honor that. It's about common sense and awareness really. Who knows, I may go back to veganism at some point in the future. I truly don't know. But I know I feel stronger, and better in many ways for including fish and eggs in my diet. It's an ongoing process.

    Thanks guys. I actually waited for a month or so before I posted about transitioning from a vegan diet. I've always been health conscious, and much of that starts with our food choices. I always said, even as a vegan, that if I felt the need for meat or animal protein in my diet, I would honor that. It's about common sense and awareness really. Who knows, I may go back to veganism at some point in the future. I truly don't know. But I know I feel stronger, and better in many ways for including fish and eggs in my diet. It's an ongoing process.

  • Brock Lee

    Brock Lee Los Angeles, California

    Please allow me to begin by saying, I respect and applaud you for recognizing the importance of eating and practicing a healthy lifestyle. Kudos to you in your enduring efforts. You look great and clearly have benefit from it, despite your cited concerns which prompted the changes mentioned. Good to hear you're seeing positive impacts in many areas of your life already. By the way, I am glad you sought a Holistic doctor vs. western medicine/conventional. Hopefully this was a holistic doctor who specializes in nutrition, but I know you conduct your diligence, and are incredibly intelligent, so I'm sure you were in stellar hands. The reason I felt compelled to comment, is I so very often hear people say they are Vegans (hats off!), yet I only hear about one component of it - diet. I think the definition of true Veganism has been lost through the years. Veganism is much more than the omission of all animal derived products from your diet. It is a lifestyle, wherein avoiding consumption of animal products is one piece of the overall "Vegan Pie", lol. If you abstain from animal products (including dairy and eggs), then you are a vegetarian, not necessarily a Vegan. If you abstain from eating meat/animal products with exception of dairy and/or eggs, then that is defined as a lacto/ovo vegetarian. If you also eat only fish (no meat) in addition to that, you are a pescetarian. Technically, true Veganism is both the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated philosophy into other areas of the Vegan life. It opposes the use of animals for any purpose extending not only to matters of food but also to the wearing or using of non-consumable animal products; animal testing; while advocating the avoidance of animal products on the premise that the harvesting or industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable. No surprise with approximately 35% of all the land's surface devoted to the livestock sector as last reported, in other words, factory farms. Organic farms are such a small component they are essentially immeasurable. A 2010 UN report, Assessing the Environmental Impacts of Consumption and Production (Factory Farms), argued that animal products "in general require more resources and cause higher emissions than plant-based alternatives". It argued that a move away from animal products is needed to reduce environmental damage. I won't even begin to get into the chemical laden, filthy, genetically modified aspects of which are applicable in 90% of today's factory farms....or the extreme lack of governance over these operations. I say if you hunt, eat what you kill, but do not eat conventional animal products. Go to Farmers' Markets and find reliable organic sources of foods including meat. In addition, if each of us at least reduces our animal product purchases and consumption, it would lead to extraordinary benefits throughout the world by way of reducing individual carbon footprint, minimizing deforestation, reducing pollution/runoff which is destroying our oceans (30% of public water systems/sewage is allowed by law to be dumped into our oceans, among other pollutants). I certainly hope I have not offended anyone or come across as an extremist, because I am not, or one to preach what kind of lifestyle the world should live. I'm very open minded, non-judgmental, and my intent here, is SOLELY to clarify and increase awareness. I am, what I'd consider, "the kind advocate". Most Sincerely, Brock Lee

    Please allow me to begin by saying, I respect and applaud you for recognizing the importance of eating and practicing a healthy lifestyle. Kudos to you in your enduring efforts. You look great and clearly have benefit from it, despite your cited concerns which prompted the changes mentioned. Good to hear you're seeing positive impacts in many areas of your life already. By the way, I am glad you sought a Holistic doctor vs. western medicine/conventional. Hopefully this was a holistic doctor who specializes in nutrition, but I know you conduct your diligence, and are incredibly intelligent, so I'm sure you were in stellar hands.

    The reason I felt compelled to comment, is I so very often hear people say they are Vegans (hats off!), yet I only hear about one component of it - diet. I think the definition of true Veganism has been lost through the years. Veganism is much more than the omission of all animal derived products from your diet. It is a lifestyle, wherein avoiding consumption of animal products is one piece of the overall "Vegan Pie", lol. If you abstain from animal products (including dairy and eggs), then you are a vegetarian, not necessarily a Vegan. If you abstain from eating meat/animal products with exception of dairy and/or eggs, then that is defined as a lacto/ovo vegetarian. If you also eat only fish (no meat) in addition to that, you are a pescetarian.

    Technically, true Veganism is both the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, and an associated philosophy into other areas of the Vegan life. It opposes the use of animals for any purpose extending not only to matters of food but also to the wearing or using of non-consumable animal products; animal testing; while advocating the avoidance of animal products on the premise that the harvesting or industrial farming of animals is environmentally damaging and unsustainable. No surprise with approximately 35% of all the land's surface devoted to the livestock sector as last reported, in other words, factory farms. Organic farms are such a small component they are essentially immeasurable. A 2010 UN report, Assessing the Environmental Impacts of Consumption and Production (Factory Farms), argued that animal products "in general require more resources and cause higher emissions than plant-based alternatives". It argued that a move away from animal products is needed to reduce environmental damage. I won't even begin to get into the chemical laden, filthy, genetically modified aspects of which are applicable in 90% of today's factory farms....or the extreme lack of governance over these operations.

    I say if you hunt, eat what you kill, but do not eat conventional animal products. Go to Farmers' Markets and find reliable organic sources of foods including meat. In addition, if each of us at least reduces our animal product purchases and consumption, it would lead to extraordinary benefits throughout the world by way of reducing individual carbon footprint, minimizing deforestation, reducing pollution/runoff which is destroying our oceans (30% of public water systems/sewage is allowed by law to be dumped into our oceans, among other pollutants).

    I certainly hope I have not offended anyone or come across as an extremist, because I am not, or one to preach what kind of lifestyle the world should live. I'm very open minded, non-judgmental, and my intent here, is SOLELY to clarify and increase awareness. I am, what I'd consider, "the kind advocate".

    Most Sincerely,

    Brock Lee

  • Anonymous

    Anonymous

    It's good to quit if veganism doesn't suit you. There are other ways to eat healthy. I also experienced the same. I tried veganism but it just doesn't suit my lifestyle. Oftentimes while working as a top rated resume writers in the land, I'd always feel hungry, sad and depressed all at the same time. I'm more content now that I am not limiting what type of foods I eat.

    It's good to quit if veganism doesn't suit you. There are other ways to eat healthy. I also experienced the same. I tried veganism but it just doesn't suit my lifestyle. Oftentimes while working as a top rated resume writers in the land, I'd always feel hungry, sad and depressed all at the same time. I'm more content now that I am not limiting what type of foods I eat.

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